The Power of Voice

A Student teacher just trying to find her voice

419,786 notes

In shock and deeply saddened like so many. He was a force and a presence in my world throughout my entire life. Hook, Flubber, Aladdin, Mrs. Doubtfire, Jumanji, Good Will Hunting - not to mention Dead Poet’s Society and the influence that had on me as a young lover of literature when I first watched it. That film helped me to feel validated in my love and passion for literature and in my desire to one day teach it. I can’t believe this is now a world Without Robin Williams, but it is at least a world that has been made better by Robin Williams. May he rest in everlasting, beautiful peace.

In shock and deeply saddened like so many. He was a force and a presence in my world throughout my entire life. Hook, Flubber, Aladdin, Mrs. Doubtfire, Jumanji, Good Will Hunting - not to mention Dead Poet’s Society and the influence that had on me as a young lover of literature when I first watched it. That film helped me to feel validated in my love and passion for literature and in my desire to one day teach it. I can’t believe this is now a world Without Robin Williams, but it is at least a world that has been made better by Robin Williams. May he rest in everlasting, beautiful peace.

(Source: missmegrose, via englishmajorinrepair)

Filed under robin williams i'm at a loss

639 notes

Researchers have shown that reading fiction promotes empathy. Children’s book author and illustrator, Anne Dewdney, echoes that finding when she argues that, “When we open a book, and share our voice and imagination with a child, that child learns to see the world through someone else’s eyes.” Sadly, studies reveal that parents in the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain spend less time reading and telling stories to their sons than to their daughters. In fact, in as early as nine months, researchers found a gender gap in literary activities.
Why It’s Imperative to Teach Empathy to Boys | MindShift (via the-gwendolyn-reading-method)

(via teachingliteracy)

54 notes

sahlineelnagrom asked: I'm about to start my first year teaching and I was wondering what you would suggest as "must haves" for a middle school ELA classroom. Thank you :) love the blog!

girlwithalessonplan:

  • sorting trays if that’s your thing
  • Milk crate esque boxes if you plan on kids keeping journals in class
  • binders to organize hard copies of your units
  • index cards—lots.  Good for bell ringers and class closers (post it notes can do this too)
  • A good bulletin board if your room doesn’t have one so expectations/procedures can be posted clearly
  • craft stash: construction paper, markers, crayons, scissors, glue sticks
  • I go through a lot of manila folders.  You can staple them to walls for instant pockets, quickly sort stacks of paper, etc. etc.

Filed under teaching tips

146 notes

pre-serviceteacher asked: Do you have a classroom yourself? If so, I'm about to be a teacher next year and would LOVE any advice you can give me about encouraging reading inside and outside of the classroom? What sparked your love of literacy?

teachingliteracy:

congrats! you’re going to LOVE your work, for sure.  :)

i don’t have a classroom anymore. since i’m a reading specialist/coach, i work with teachers rather than small groups of students.  (i love my job.) my passion for literacy began when i was little.  my parents used to take me to the library all. the. time.  i just fell in love with the written word and its ability to transport me to different places.

to encourage reading inside and outside of the classroom, i’d suggest:

  • create a diverse and well-stocked classroom library, spanning all genres (including comics and magazines); you don’t have to spend a tone of money…scholastic reading club is great for building class libraries cheaply, as are trips to local book sales and garage sales.  
  • make your children read every night for their reading homework.  i don’t know the grade you’ll be teaching, but i’d say 5 minutes for K-1, 10 minutes for 2nd grade, 15 minutes for 3rd, and 20 minutes for 4th-8th grades.  find a reading log online or create your own requiring a parent/guardian to sign off on the reading homework. let them read whatever they choose for homework.  also, read alouds by parents/guardians count toward the time, too.  allow kids to pick books from your class library to take home.  (you’ll need a checkout system that works for you.)
  • require students to keep a (separate) log of books read in a notebook or on a blog page.  it’ll be great for students to recognize patterns in their reading choices and feel that they are accomplishing something. 
  • book talks or book trailers are awesome (i’m a huge fan of the latter).  once a week, show students a trailer or book talk (lots are online).  bonus points if the book is already in your library.  display the book in a prominent spot and let kids check it out.
  • READ A LOT yourself!  read books that are age appropriate for your students.  talk about what you’re reading.  tell them how much you loved book X and then display it for students to check out.
  • give them opportunities to talk about the books they’re reading at home.  maybe you make it part of a Fun Friday or have kids draw a picture/poster/movie trailer of a book they love once a month.  
  • allow them to abandon books, if they choose. (this applies more for 2-8th graders)  just monitor their book logs to make sure that they are not making it an avoidance technique. guide them toward books they may enjoy, if needed.

hope that helps!  good luck and give me an update next year as to how it all works out.  :)

lovely lovely.

Filed under teaching tips

440 notes

powells:

21 books you should finally finish reading this summer: http://powells.us/1stvQVD

This is a book I need to re-read this summer. I read it in my junior year of high school and it changed me completely as a person and as a reader that it has been, for a long time, my answer to the ‘what’s your favorite book’ question. However, many books have changed me since then and there have been contenders for favorite book. I need to read Dorian again and see where we stand now, but it will always have a special place in my heart.

powells:

21 books you should finally finish reading this summer: http://powells.us/1stvQVD

This is a book I need to re-read this summer. I read it in my junior year of high school and it changed me completely as a person and as a reader that it has been, for a long time, my answer to the ‘what’s your favorite book’ question. However, many books have changed me since then and there have been contenders for favorite book. I need to read Dorian again and see where we stand now, but it will always have a special place in my heart.

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

Filed under books books books this is me